Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bombaybacon

Ethernet Through the Power Outlet

Recommended Posts

Does anyone use one of these ethernet powerline adapters?

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Powerline-Pass-Through-TL-PA9020P-KIT/dp/B01H74VKZU/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1548943758&sr=8-5&keywords=tp+link+powerline+adapter

I just ordered one for my son who plays the Xbox in the bonus room over wifi. He's always complaining about lag and timing out. He said his friend got something like this and it works really well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never used one.  Nor have I heard much about them, but if they're reliable and works great, let us know.  Cause I'd be willing to try it out with my Xbox and PS4 in the living room since both are running off wi-fi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Bombaybacon said:

Does anyone use one of these ethernet powerline adapters?

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Powerline-Pass-Through-TL-PA9020P-KIT/dp/B01H74VKZU/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1548943758&sr=8-5&keywords=tp+link+powerline+adapter

I just ordered one for my son who plays the Xbox in the bonus room over wifi. He's always complaining about lag and timing out. He said his friend got something like this and it works really well.

 

 

23 minutes ago, xJediDadx said:

I've never used one.  Nor have I heard much about them, but if they're reliable and works great, let us know.  Cause I'd be willing to try it out with my Xbox and PS4 in the living room since both are running off wi-fi

I use one in my house. I had never heard of it before the person at Canada Computers recommended it when I was explaining issues with my wireless setup and range in my house. I bought mine about 3 years ago and never looked back. 

My router resides in the front of my basement as that is where the internet comes into my house. I've looked at trying to move it and who I would move it multiple times and could never find a good solution. As it stood, my main level and especially rear upper level suffered greatly from lack of WiFi.

The power line adapter I bought I plugged in on my main level on an outside wall. This gave me a great boost to my WiFi signal on my main level, upper level and outside in my back yard. The WiFi now covers everywhere.

The only streaming, other than our phones, that is on the power line WiFi is a Blu-ray player on my main level that sits very close to the power line adapter and streams Netflix almost daily. I rarely notice issues. Most issues I get are generally the Blu-ray player itself.

I run a 50' Cat 6 cable to my Xbox directly from my router. The cable runs along the base board in a cable channel to keep it hidden and protected from kids running around.

Info to consider:

-The power line adapter broadcasts a completely different wireless signal. It will show up as another wireless network. My phones are set up with both networks so as I walk around the house, the phones (for the most part) seamlessly jump from network to network. If I'm streaming a video and cross from one to the next, there could be a stutter as it re-connects and starts to buffer again.

-The power line network might not run as fast. I believe mine is 54Mbps. My incoming internet is 150Mbps. 54 is more than enough for anything I'm doing on my phone or streaming on my Blu-ray player. I notice the one you listed says 2000Mbps. That seems exceptionally high... I'm not sure I would expect that through your power line, but even if it was half that speed, you should still be flying.

-If you're planning to use it wirelessly for your gaming, keep in mind how close your console is to it. If the console sits near a border in signal strength between your two networks, it may bounce between them. This may cause more issues. If you are close to the power line adapter, they have an Ethernet port directly on them that will allow you to plug in to them, eliminating any wireless breakdown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, SGrant7 said:

 

 

I use one in my house. I had never heard of it before the person at Canada Computers recommended it when I was explaining issues with my wireless setup and range in my house. I bought mine about 3 years ago and never looked back. 

My router resides in the front of my basement as that is where the internet comes into my house. I've looked at trying to move it and who I would move it multiple times and could never find a good solution. As it stood, my main level and especially rear upper level suffered greatly from lack of WiFi.

The power line adapter I bought I plugged in on my main level on an outside wall. This gave me a great boost to my WiFi signal on my main level, upper level and outside in my back yard. The WiFi now covers everywhere.

The only streaming, other than our phones, that is on the power line WiFi is a Blu-ray player on my main level that sits very close to the power line adapter and streams Netflix almost daily. I rarely notice issues. Most issues I get are generally the Blu-ray player itself.

I run a 50' Cat 6 cable to my Xbox directly from my router. The cable runs along the base board in a cable channel to keep it hidden and protected from kids running around.

Info to consider:

-The power line adapter broadcasts a completely different wireless signal. It will show up as another wireless network. My phones are set up with both networks so as I walk around the house, the phones (for the most part) seamlessly jump from network to network. If I'm streaming a video and cross from one to the next, there could be a stutter as it re-connects and starts to buffer again.

-The power line network might not run as fast. I believe mine is 54Mbps. My incoming internet is 150Mbps. 54 is more than enough for anything I'm doing on my phone or streaming on my Blu-ray player. I notice the one you listed says 2000Mbps. That seems exceptionally high... I'm not sure I would expect that through your power line, but even if it was half that speed, you should still be flying.

-If you're planning to use it wirelessly for your gaming, keep in mind how close your console is to it. If the console sits near a border in signal strength between your two networks, it may bounce between them. This may cause more issues. If you are close to the power line adapter, they have an Ethernet port directly on them that will allow you to plug in to them, eliminating any wireless breakdown.

This one is actually an ethernet cable that plugs into the wall. So you connect the router (wherever it is) to the box in a power outlet. Then the other box goes into the power outlet near the Xbox (in this case) and an ethernet cable connects the box with the Xbox so it looks like it is running over a cable and not wifi.

I'm supposed to get the device Friday (according to Amazon) so I'll let you know how good it is. This should certainly lift my son's spirits cause he's been home sick with the flu all week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd rather have this then a Wi-Fi Extender.  I absolutely hate those things.  Though I have been debating about flipping over to a WiFi Mesh system, but that's for another section of forum. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that's the same way mine works. But mine also broadcast a wireless signal. I didn't notice that these ones do not...

My primary box is plugged into the wall right near my router. A cable from my router goes directly into the power line box. The internet signal is then sent through my power lines to the other box that I've set up on my main level. It then broadcasts the wireless signal from there. But I can also plug an Ethernet cable into it if I choose.

That should certainly help boost his speeds on the Xbox though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, xJediDadx said:

I'd rather have this then a Wi-Fi Extender.  I absolutely hate those things.  Though I have been debating about flipping over to a WiFi Mesh system, but that's for another section of forum. lol

Ya, whole home Mesh would be great. But they ain't cheap. All the internet companies here provide router/modem combos. Which means that you got to throw the one they send you into bridge mode and then broadcast the signal from there. I've found some issues doing the bridge mode thing in the past with port forwarding and what not for my Xbox. It's the whole reason I bought the 50' Cat 6 cable in the first place. 

It would be nice if our ISP offered Mesh, then I wouldn't need extenders, 50' cables, or additional routers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never saw this one when i bought mine 3 years ago... but the ability to clone your WiFi would be nice. Make one seamless internet like a Mesh system.

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-N300-Powerline-Gigabit-2-Ethernet/dp/B010S6SFDE?ref_=bl_dp_s_web_2530652011

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use similar stuff as I found it way better than my initial try using wifi adapters on every computer.

Router in my house is upstairs in the den where my oldest son has his desk/computer setup. This router is connected to one these adapters (cable only) which then has another adapter in my other sons room for his desk/computer setup. The original owner of my house had the router connection setup upstairs and then sent through the wall via cat5 (I think) downstairs to the living room so there I hook up the various consoles to the main TV plus another adapter (cable only), via another router that extends my wifi, which is then used with an adapter in my bedroom (downstairs) for my own desk/computer setup. 

I originally started with a wifi adapter upstairs doing something similar, but after some revamping of how I had it setup, I worked it out to use cables and dedicated routers for wifi which I think turned out much better (for my kids since I had the router sitting next to my computer then). I also recall the wifi adapter would heat up quite a bit and that might have been due to the number of connections hitting it while having to work to manage the overall connection coming in from downstairs via wifi (which really could suck for my kids at times).

I think I get something like 100Mbps in at the router and 75Mbps in at my computer. From what I understand of using these, the loss you take going through the plugs will depend on the wiring they use (and I imagine, how old it is). My house is about 8 years old now so fairly fresh and new so your mileage may vary with older wiring.

Here's what I bought for the cable only adapters (2 of them to cover what I have now):

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B010Q29KRK/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I hope things turn out great for you with the new setup!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know Mesh is expensive. But it can cover a huge house with 2 or 3 of the broadcast points.  Plus the one's I've been looking at have 2 ethernet ports on them so i can plug things into those and it acts like it's wired to a router/switch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×