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I finally found it!

      The document is titled "Historical Development Summary of Automatic Cannon Caliber Ammunition: 20-30 Millimeter." Dated (also declassified) January 1984. Written by Dale M. Davis, Munitions Division, AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND*UNITED STATES AIR FORCE*EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA. (The period covered by the report is 1952 to 1983.)

I quote:

"SECTION VII
HIGH DENSITY PENETRATORS


        Perhaps the most spectacular aspect of the GAU-8 gun is the effect of its high length-to-diameter ratio (subcaliber) depleted uranium penetrator upon striking armor. We started studying this technology before 1970 and had the technology in hand in time for full scale development along with the GAU-8 gun and its ammunition and production release in 1975. We thought we were pioneering in this area. Now it seems, or at least this author believes, that we have "reinvented the wheel," or at least reinvented high length-to-diameter ratio uranium penetrators. The Germans did it first in World War II.

        It is well known that the Germans made considerable use of tungsten carbide, or "wolframstahl," which translates to tungsten steel, as armor penetrator cores. That uranium was substituted for tungsten during the war is apparent from the comments of Nazi Production Minister Albert Speer in his book, "Inside the Third Reich", when he comments that the Germans had given up on the development of an atomic bomb and "In the summer of 1943 wolframite imports from Portugal were cut off, which created a critical situation for the production of solid-core ammunition. I thereupon ordered the use of uranium cores for this type of ammunition." He also notes in a footnote that "In 1940 twelve hundred metric tons of uranium ore had been seized in Belgium." This author recalls reading, in the early 1960's, a first hand report from a German serving on the eastern front in 1944 which contained a most striking description of the effect of new German anti-armor ammunition; this description can only be understood after one has seen the effect of a uranium penetrator.  Figure 13 is a reproduction of pages 58 and 59 of "Handbook of German Aircraft Ammunition", a compilation and translation done at Aberdeen Proving Ground and published in 1956. At the time and until this writing, it was  assumed that this was a tungsten cored round. Looking at it critically today one suspects that it was probably uranium. Points that indicate this are:

(1) It was called an H-Panzergrenat-patrone, or "special armor grenade cartridge." Why grenade? There is no explosive or incendiary except if one considers the pyrophoric effect of uranium.

(2) It is called a "special steel core." If it were tungsten, it would have been called "tungsten steel."

(3) It is called a special armor piercing projectile with added incendiary effect. Where is the incendiary if not in the pyrophoric effect of uranium?

(4) The capability of penetration of 100 mm of any kind of armor precludes it being any type of steel by US definition. It has to be either tungsten or uranium. 

(5) It is described as being "Exclusively for attacking medium and heavy tanks. Practice firing prohibited." This is the only German round known to have the restriction "practice firing prohibited." Why? Remember, German uranium was "as refined"; it was not "depleted uranium" as we know it. 

(6) This round was used by tank busting squadrons on the eastern front. There are no known reports of it being used on the western front. There are no known reports of uranium cores or the uranium [pyrophoric] effect on the western front. The Germans would have had no qualms about using toxic or radioactive materials against the "barbarians" on the eastern front; they may have hesitated about using it against the "civilized" people in the west. Also, they knew the British or Americans could copy it. Once compromised, they would have felt secure the Russians could not.

(7) The round in Figure 13 was "Issued to Service" in June 1944, about a year after Speer "ordered the use of uranium cores for this type ammunition." Also this was about a year after they lost their source of tungsten.

        In 1974, when we were about ready to introduce the GAU-8 into the inventory, this author was discussing uranium penetrators and the German use of them in World War II with personnel at the Federal Republic of Germany Ministry of Defense in Bonn. Their personnel were not aware of any wartime use of uranium for AP cores, but said they would look into it. In 1979 in a subsequent meeting and discussion, Peter Schopen in Bonn said they had been unable to uncover any records of uranium being used for penetrators even in R&D; yet from Speer's statements, it was a virtual certainty that they were aware of its effectiveness as early as 1943. Was all of the uranium penetrator work done in East Germany and the data not available to the west after the war? Probably so..."

There is so much more information, but I have attached 'Figure 13' referenced multiple times in the document, and I will work up this round's armor perforation data shortly.

 

OPFOR - OUT!

3-cm H-Pzgr L'spur o-Zerl, API-T (u), X-section.jpg

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Greetings all. (I'm in DHO-6.)   I decided to try my hand at starting my own forum stream. If I don't get flamed too badly, maybe I can present some interesting 'ammo porn' [unclassified data &

[Whew!]  The 'flame' comment was just my forum-cherry being popped, I suppose...   Yeah, me & Craw go waaayyy back in history. We started out playing RISK & PANZER BLITZ & other AH gam

wtfovr (I know what that means!): "I assume you guys also run the wargaming simulators in Korea for UFL..."   Yup, that's us!  I usually get sent to Camp Casey (oh JOY!!!). Matter of fact, I'm the

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My previously posted anti-armor chart for the 30mm H-Pzgr (w) is up to date & here's the EXCEL graph showing this projectile's range-to-penetration. The projectile ballistic coefficient is estimated to most closely match the Standard Projectile 6, and using the historical weight & diameter of the projectile, the striking velocity was estimated. 

I have yet to find a definitive source for the 'Arrowhead' APCR projectile, but since this round doesn't use this particular shape, the type 6 is usable in modern ballistic calculators.

Like I wrote previously, my perforation figures are predicated on the target Brinell Hardness Number from 220-to-330 for a tungsten carbide AP core of 16mm diameter... not the weapon bore caliber of 30mm.

 

Standardization of all WoT weapons performance would (I think) make it a better arcade game & greatly reduce the tendency toward 'Russian Bias.'

 

OPFOR - OUT!

3-cm Mk 103, H-Pzgr L'spur o-Zerl, APCR-T (w), Excel Graph.jpg

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Did anybody else notice that the default 'Armor-Piercing' projectile for the new gift T-34 1941's L-11 gun is  actually a Soviet/Russian SHRAPNEL shell if the designation is to be believed: "The complete rounds USh-354 with Sh-354 projectile using a 22P or 22PG fuze, USh-354T with a Sh-354T projectile using a T-6 fuze, and USh-354U with a Sh-354U projectile using a 22PG or T-6 fuze are variants of the illustrated round.  These variants are basically the same as the USh-354G and are fired from the same weapons."

WARGAMING researchers got some of the details wrong once more!

 

OPFOR - OUT!

76,2mm USh-354T, Shrapnel Shell.jpg

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